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Use the “PRICE” Method for Treating Sprains and Strains

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man leaning down to grab sore ankle

The hot summer weather that has many of us spending so much time outdoors — walking, running, hiking, golfing, playing tennis — often means an inevitable increase in strains and sprains.

Assuming your injury isn’t serious enough to warrant a trip to the ER, you may be wondering how to treat your new sprain or strain.

Should you apply ice? Or is it heat? What else can you do?

The best treatment for a sprain or strain is with the “PRICE” method, a helpful acronym that is useful to remember when you have an acute injury.

Please note that if you are unsure of the severity of your sprain or strain, you should talk to your doctor before beginning any treatment or rehabilitation.

Remember P.R.I.C.E.

These five simple rules will help speed up your recovery in the first 48-72 hours of a sprain (ligament) or strain (muscle) injury.

P is for PROTECTION.

Protect the injured area from sustaining any more damage.

R is for REST.

Allow the injury time to heal.

I is for ICE.

man leaning down to grab sore ankle

Ice should be applied to an injured area as soon as possible.

Use the 10/10/10 method of ice application: 10 minutes of ice; followed by 10 minutes of rest without ice; followed by 10 minutes of ice again. Do not apply heat. Ice works to reduce pain and inflammation to your injured muscles, joints and tissues and may even slow bleeding if a tear has occurred.

C is for COMPRESSION.

Use a tensor bandage to wrap the injured area. When wrapping, begin at the end furthest away from the heart.

E is for ELEVATION.

If possible, raise the injured area above the level of the heart, especially at night, by putting a pillow under the injured area.

After the first 48 hours, slowly start to use the injured area again and continue icing for another day. If you are unsure of the severity of your injury, consult a docotr or chiropractor for an evaluation.


The wellness team at Pickering Village Chiropractic & Massage provides our patients with more than just chiropractic and massage therapy services, but also the know-how to build better personal wellness habits so you can be at your best for work or play, every day.

To book an appointment or learn more about the chiropractic and therapeutic massage therapy services available at our clinic, call 905-427-3202.

 

With content from the Canadian Chiropractic Association.

Ice or Heat? Remember the “PRICE” Method for Treating Sprains and Strains

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strains and sprains ajax pickering chiropractor

The warm spring weather that has many of us spending an increasing amount of time outdoors — walking, running, hiking, golfing, playing tennis — often means an inevitable increase in strains and sprains.

Assuming your injury isn’t serious enough to warrant a trip to the ER, you may be wondering how to treat your new sprain or strain.

Should you apply ice? Or is it heat? What else can you do?

The best treatment for a sprain or strain is with the “PRICE” method, a helpful acronym that is useful to remember when you have an acute injury.

Please note, if you are unsure of the severity of your sprain or strain, you should talk to your doctor before beginning any treatment or rehabilitation.

Remember P.R.I.C.E.

These five simple rules will help speed up your recovery in the first 48-72 hours of a sprain (ligament) or strain (muscle) injury.

P is for PROTECTION.

Protect the injured area from sustaining any more damage.

R is for REST.

Allow the injury time to heal.

I is for ICE.

Ice should be applied to an injured area as soon as possible.

Use the 10/10/10 method of ice application: 10 minutes of ice; followed by 10 minutes of rest without ice; followed by 10 minutes of ice again. Do not apply heat. Ice works to reduce pain and inflammation to your injured muscles, joints and tissues and may even slow bleeding if a tear has occurred.

C is for COMPRESSION.

Use a tensor bandage to wrap the injured area. When wrapping, begin at the end furthest away from the heart.

E is for ELEVATION.

If possible, raise the injured area above the level of the heart, especially at night, by putting a pillow under the injured area.

After the first 48 hours, slowly start to use the injured area again and continue icing for another day. If you are unsure of the severity of your injury, consult a docotr or chiropractor for an evaluation.


Related posts:

Five Tips for Transitioning from the Treadmill to the Sidewalk

Tips for Avoiding Injury While Working Outside This Spring

Four Easy Stretches to Avoid Injury on the Golf Course

 

The wellness team at Pickering Village Chiropractic & Massage provides our patients with more than just chiropractic and massage therapy services, but also the know-how to build better personal wellness habits so you can be at your best for work or play, every day.

To book an appointment or learn more about the chiropractic and therapeutic massage therapy services available at our clinic, call 905-427-3202.

 

 

 

With content from the Canadian Chiropractic Association.

8 Tips for Winter Walking (in the Spring)

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Who knew we’d still be writing about ice and snow in the middle of April?

Seeing as the majority of Ontarians are dealing with some form of winter weather this week, we’d thought we review some helpful tips for walking in winter-like weather from the Canadian Chiropractic Association.

8 Tips for Winter Walking

Whether you’re going outside for some exercise, running an errand, or simply getting to and from a vehicle, winter walking can be hazardous.

There are some precautions you can take to make sure you get to your destination safely. Here are 8 tips to avoid a slip and fall on snow or ice:

  1. Choose the right footwear: there are some great options for winter boots that provide slip-resistance. Look for these features: rubber soles, non-slip tread
  2. Plan ahead: Give yourself extra travel time so you can walk without being rushed
  3. Don’t be distracted: Avoid walking and using your phone at the same time
  4. Be on the lookout for ice: Avoid icy patches when possible. When in doubt, assume that all dark and wet pavement surfaces are slippery
  5. Be prepared: If you don’t have salt for your stairs, driveway, or walkway, use sand or non-clumping cat litter to sprinkle on icy surfaces outdoors. If possible, only walk on paths that receive maintenance. Don’t take shortcuts where snow isn’t regularly removed
  6. Use support: Use handrails when available and steady yourself on the door frame of your car when getting in and out of a vehicle
  7. Don’t compromise your balance: Avoid carrying items in your arms as that may cause you to be unbalanced. Walking with your arms swinging at your sides is the best way to maintain balance. Make sure to keep your hands out of your pockets to help with balance and walking posture (don’t forget your gloves)
  8. Walk like a penguin: When the terrain is super slippery, try practising these “penguin-like” techniques for stability:
    • Keep your feet “flat-footed” (place your whole foot down at once—this also slows your walking speed)
    • Take short strides or shuffle your feet forward
    • Keep your knees slightly bent and feet pointed out. Lean forward slightly

Make sure to check for weather updates before you head out. And if you have experienced a slip or fall, book an assessment with Ajax chiropractors Dr. John Noble or Dr. Mark Fera.

Article credit: Canadian Chiropractic Association